Advanced Materials and Smart Infrastructure Systems (AMSIS)
Muhammad M. Sherif
Assistant Professor
Advanced Materials and Smart Infrastructure Systems (AMSIS)
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Citations 76
h-index 5
i10-index 3
RG-Score 14.41
Reads 1288







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Updated:  14 October 2019
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Muhammad M. Sherif
Assistant Professor

Ph.D. 2018 - University of Virginia, USA
M.S. 2013 - Carnegie Mellon University, USA
B.S. 2011 - United Arab Emirates University, UAE

Advanced Materials and Smart Infrastructure Systems (AMSIS)
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
University of Alabama - Birmingham (UAB)
Hoehn Engineering Building, Office 331
Phone: (205) 934-8436

E-mail: msherif@uab.edu


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03/31/2017

Investigations on Cyclic Flexural Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites using Digital Image Correlation and Acoustic Emissions

M. Sherif*, O.E. Ozbulut, J. Tanks

Superelastic shape memory alloys (SE SMAs) are smart materials that recover 6–8% of inelastic strains upon unloading and exhibit good energy dissipation. In this study, the mechanical behavior of cementitious composites, reinforced with steel and SE SMA fibers, under flexure was examined. Fiber reinforced concrete, with a total fiber volume ratio of 0.6%, was prepared and a third point bending flexural test was conducted using an incrementally increasing displacement loading protocol. DIC was used to measure the strain and displacement contours and detect the crack width propagation. The results of the cyclic flexural testing were analyzed to assess the re-centering and crack recovery capabilities. Acoustic emissions (AE) were monitored using AE transducers to predict the failure modes (fiber pullout/matrix cracking). The AE were analyzed using average frequency, cumulative energy, duration and hits. The correlation between the DIC and AE was investigated. The results suggest that the crack data can be correlated with AE.
01/13/2016

Feasibility of using Shape Memory Alloys as Fiber Reinforcement in Concrete

Evelina M Khakimova, Muhammad M Sherif*, Jonathon D Tanks, Osman E Ozbulut, Devin K Harris, Celik Ozyildirim

Serviceability and post-event functionality of reinforced concrete bridge structures is greatly influenced by concrete durability, resistance to cracking and deformation recovery. Steel fiber reinforced concrete displays improved toughness and resistance to cracking. Plastic deformations of steel fibers provide significant energy dissipation. Deflection hardening behavior of steel fiber reinforced concrete mixtures leads to tighter cracks, which inhibits the penetration of harmful solutions into the concrete. However, steel fibers experience permanent deformations upon yielding and cannot provide self-centering and crack-closing properties. In this study, the use of randomly distributed shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers in concrete is studied. Five types of beam specimens with the dimensions of 76 mm × 76 mm × 292 mm are prepared for flexural tests. The first beam specimen is a plain concrete beam that serves as benchmark. The second specimen is a steel fiber reinforced concrete beam and includes 0.6% of steel fiber by volume. For the other specimens, 25%, 50% and 100% of steel fibers respectively are replaced with the NiTi SMA fibers. The SMA fibers possess a roughened surface for improved bond behavior. Three point bending tests are conducted on all specimens under cycling loading. An acoustic emission system was used to determine energy release levels during concrete cracking and fiber pullout. An optical Digital Image Correlation method is also used to measure full-field deformations and track the damage evolution on the surface of the specimens. Test results are analyzed in terms of tensile strength capacity, mid-span deflection, and crack width for each specimen.
09/08/2015

Experimental Characterization of Shape Memory Alloy Cables for Applications in Civil Structures

O.E. Ozbulut, S. Daghash, M. Sherif*

O.E. Ozbulut, S. Daghash, M. Sherif, “Experimental Characterization of Shape Memory Alloy Cables for Applications in Civil Structures”, 3rd Conference on Smart Monitoring and Rehabilitation of Civil Structures, Antalya, Turkey, September 7 - 9, 2015.
08/02/2015

Experimental Investigations on Shape Memory Alloy Fiber Reinforced Concrete

E. Khakimova, M.M. Sherif*, O.E. Ozbulut, D.K. Harris, H.C. Ozyildirim

Durability of concrete highly depends on its strength and resistance to cracking. Steel fibers improve the toughness of concrete and help control crack propagation. Plastic deformations of steel fibers provide significant energy dissipation. Strain hardening behaviour of steel fiber reinforced concrete mixtures leads to tighter cracks, which inhibits the penetration of harmful solutions into the concrete. However, steel fibers experience permanent deformations upon yielding and cannot provide self-centering and crack-closing properties. In this study, the use of randomly distributed shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers in concrete is studied. Five types of beam specimens with the dimensions of 76 mm × 76 mm × 292 mm are prepared for flexural tests. First beam specimen is a plain concrete beam that serves as benchmark. The second specimen is a steel fiber reinforced concrete beam and includes 0.6% of steel fiber by volume. The steel fibers are 0.90 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length and are designed to have high bond strength and ultra-high tensile strength. For the other specimens, 25%, 50% and 100% of steel fibers respectively are replaced with the NiTi SMA fibers. The SMA fibers are made of NiTi and have a diameter of 0.58 mm and length of 60 mm. The SMA fibers possess a roughened surface for improved bond behavior. Three point bending tests are conducted on all specimens under cycling loading. Force-deformation curves for each specimen are obtained. An optical Digital Image Correlation method is also used to measure full-field deformations and track the damage evolution on the surface of the specimens. Test results are analysed in terms of tensile strength capacity, mid-span deflection, and crack width for each specimen.
04/02/2015

Experimental Investigation of Bond in Concrete Members Reinforced with Shape Memory Alloy Bars

SM Daghash, MM Sherif*, OE Ozbulut

Conventional seismic design of reinforced concrete structures relies on yielding of steel reinforcement to dissipate energy while undergoing residual deformations. Therefore, reinforced concrete structures subjected to strong earthquakes experience large permanent displacements and are prone to severe damage or collapse. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have gained increasing acceptance in recent years for use in structural engineering due to its attractive properties such as high corrosion resistance, excellent re-centering ability, good energy dissipation capacity, and durability. SMAs can undergo large deformations in the range of 6-8% strain and return their original undeformed position upon unloading. Due to their appealing characteristics, SMAs have been considered as an alternative to traditional steel reinforcement in concrete structures to control permanent deformations. However, the behavior of SMAs in combination with concrete has yet to be explored. In particular, the bond strength is important to ensure the composite action between concrete and SMA reinforcements. This study investigates the bond behavior between SMA bars and concrete through pull-out tests. To explore the size effect on bond strength, the tests are performed using various diameters of SMA bars. For the same diameter, the tests are also conducted with different embedment length to assess the effect of embedment length on bond properties of SMA bars. To monitor the slippage of the SMA reinforcement, an optical Digital Image Correlation method is used and the bond-slip curves are obtained.
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